Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
Home Print this page Email this page
Users Online: 288


ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 138-141

Incipient iron deficiency in primary hypothyroidism


1 Department of Medicine, Adichunchingiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Karnatka, India
2 Department of Pathology, Adichunchingiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Karnatka, India
3 Department of Pharmacology, Jss University, Mysore, Karnatka, India
4 Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Government Medical College, Srinagar, Bihar, India
5 MCH Onco Surgery, Patna Medical College, Bihar, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Tanveer Hassan Banday
Department of Medicine, Adichunchingiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Karnatka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-0354.245563

Rights and Permissions

Background: Hypothyroidism affects around 1% of general population. Anemia in association with hypothyroidism has been studied since 1881. Iron deficiency has multiple adverse affects on thyroid metabolism. It decreases circulating thyroid hormone concentration, blunts thyrotropic response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and decreases serum triiodothyronine (T3). Objectives: To find the prevalence of iron deficiency in primary hypothyroids. Material and Methods: In our study, 70 patients were selected, out of which 50 were females and 20 were males, who were suffering from hypothyroidism. Iron deficiency in the study group was confirmed at baseline using multiple iron status indicators (serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity and percentage saturation). These patients were between age group 18–65 years. Results: In our study, only 14 patients (20%) manifested with anemia (which was defined as HB < 12 gm/dl), whereas the prevalence of iron deficiency (with or without anemia) was 34.2%), in which 28.5% were females and 5.70% were males, thus showing that prevalence of iron deficiency (with or without anemia) can be higher than iron deficiency anemia itself, which is supported by literature. Conclusion: Iron deficiency was present in a significant portion of patients with primary hypothyroidism. It also concluded that frequency of iron deficiency (with or without anemia) was higher than iron-deficiency anemia.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed74    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded19    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal